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Why Shyness and Introversion are Normal

Posted by Richard Conniff on June 27, 2011

 

Pumpkinseed sunfish: Better shy or sunny? (Image by jeffcurrier.com)

In her New York Times article about our tendency to regard shyness and introversion as  diseases, to be treated with antidepressants, writer Susan Cain takes some examples form the natural world:

We even find “introverts” in the animal kingdom, where 15 percent to 20 percent of many species are watchful, slow-to-warm-up types who stick to the sidelines (sometimes called “sitters”) while the other 80 percent are “rovers” who sally forth without paying much attention to their surroundings. Sitters and rovers favor different survival strategies, which could be summed up as the sitter’s “Look before you leap” versus the rover’s inclination to “Just do it!” Each strategy reaps different rewards.

IN an illustrative experiment, David Sloan Wilson, a Binghamton evolutionary biologist, dropped metal traps into a pond of pumpkinseed sunfish. The “rover” fish couldn’t help but investigate — and were immediately caught. But the “sitter” fish stayed back, making it impossible for Professor Wilson to capture them. Had Professor Wilson’s traps posed a real threat, only the sitters would have survived. But had the sitters taken Zoloft and become more like bold rovers, the entire family of pumpkinseed sunfish would have been wiped out. “Anxiety” about the trap saved the fishes’ lives.

Next, Professor Wilson used fishing nets to catch both types of fish; when he carried them back to his lab, he noted that the rovers quickly acclimated to their new environment and started eating a full five days earlier than their sitter brethren. In this situation, the rovers were the likely survivors. “There is no single best … [animal] personality,” Professor Wilson concludes in his book, “Evolution for Everyone,” “but rather a diversity of personalities maintained by natural selection.”

The same might be said of humans, 15 percent to 20 percent of whom are also born with sitter-like temperaments that predispose them to shyness and introversion.

One Response to “Why Shyness and Introversion are Normal”

  1. Marguerita Bornstein
    met this dude last night…..photo by marguerita Simpatico,no?
    Wall Photos
    14 minutes ago · Privacy: · Like · · Share

    Mark Natale likes this.
    Marguerita Bornstein nnoooooo. him lives in a house that used to be a sausage factory,ha!!!!!!!
    4 minutes ago · Like
    Marguerita Bornstein he is flirty and a good swimmer
    2 minutes ago · Like
    Write a comment…

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