strange behaviors

Cool doings from the natural and human worlds

  • Richard Conniff

  • Reviews for Richard Conniff’s Books

    Every Creeping Thing: True Tales of Faintly Repulsive Wildlife: “Conniff is a splendid writer–fresh, clear, uncondescending, and with never a false step; one can’t resist quoting him.” (NY Times Book Review)

    The Species Seekers:  Heroes, Fools, and the Mad Pursuit of Life on Earth by Richard Conniff is “a swashbuckling romp” that “brilliantly evokes that just-before Darwin era” (BBC Focus) and “an enduring story bursting at the seams with intriguing, fantastical and disturbing anecdotes” (New Scientist). “This beautifully written book has the verve of an adventure story” (Wall St. Journal)

    Swimming with Piranhas at Feeding Time by Richard Conniff  is “Hilariously informative…This book will remind you why you always wanted to be a naturalist.” (Outside magazine) “Field naturalist Conniff’s animal adventures … are so amusing and full color that they burst right off the page …  a quick and intensely pleasurable read.” (Seed magazine) “Conniff’s poetic accounts of giraffes drifting past like sail boats, and his feeble attempts to educate Vervet monkeys on the wonders of tissue paper will leave your heart and sides aching.  An excellent read.” (BBC Focus magazine)

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Posts Tagged ‘poisoning’

Texans Say Gassing Rattlesnakes Not Really Fun For Entire Family

Posted by Richard Conniff on January 21, 2014

(Photo: Paul Sutherland/Getty Images)

(Photo: Paul Sutherland/Getty Images)

UPDATE:  The Parks and Wildlife Commission last night pulled the gassing issue off the agenda for tomorrow’s meeting. No reason given.  The commission expects to hear the issue at its next meeting on March 27, a few weeks AFTER the Sweetwater Roundup.  Meanwhile, keep your comments coming (see below).

My latest, for Takepart:

Here’s an entertaining outdoorsy idea for springtime in Texas: Fill a garden sprayer with gasoline, and go around spraying the fumes into the cracks, crevices, sinkholes, and caves where rattlesnakes make their dens. Do it early in March, when the snakes are just drowsily waking up from their winter hibernation and too helpless to defend themselves.

Then as the snakes escape to the surface to flee the noxious fumes, pick them up, toss them in a sack, and bring them to the “world’s largest rattlesnake roundup,” held on March 8 and 9 in Sweetwater, Texas.  It’s billed by the Sweetwater Jaycees as “fun for the entire family” and a major fund-raising event for local civic groups.

If, on the other hand, gassing semiconscious rattlers sounds like a barbaric vestige from our own cave-dwelling days, you may want to drop in on the Jan. 23 meeting of the State Parks and Wildlife Department in Austin. Commissioners are likely to Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Environmental Issues | Tagged: , , , | 9 Comments »

How Naturalists Die

Posted by Richard Conniff on October 17, 2013

Oh, geez. A field biologist has charted all the ways naturalists have died on my Wall of the Dead.  Is this cautionary?  Or just macabre?

Anyway, here you go.  It automatically saved to my computer as death.jpg:

How naturalists die.

How naturalists die.

Posted in Fear & Courage, The Species Seekers | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »